In hmolscience, proton-electron configuration, “geometrical electron-proton patter” (Weiss, 1925), or “electron-proton configuration” (Lundberg, 1939), is a reductionism term which refers to a thing, being it a molecule, plant, animal, tissue, or human, from a physical sociology perspective, i.e. a human seen as a "configuration" or grouping of protons and electrons, in a bound state, in modern retrospect. [1]

Quotes
In 1925, Albert Weiss, in his section "Physical Units", of his A Theoretical Basis of Human Behavior, citing John McLennan (1922) (Ѻ) and Harvey Lemon (1923), opened to the following statement: [5]

“Physicists are fairly well agreed that negative and positive electrical particles, described as electrons and protons, are the hypothetical ultimate elements out of which every thing is built up.”

Weiss then jumps to the conclusion that man is a "geometrical electron-proton pattern or system" as follows:

“For purposes of description, each separate geometrical electron-proton pattern, no matter how simple or complex it may be, is to be regarded as a system. Such systems may be classified into the degrees of the similarity or dissimilarity postulated of atoms, molecules, compounds, tissues, plants, animals, men, races, nations, planets, etc. The systems of especial interest to the behaviorist are classified under animal tissues and social organizations.”
Albert Weiss (1925), A Theoretical Basis of Human Behavior (pg. 19)

“In the final analysis, human behavior is reduced to movements between electron-proton systems, but this reduction is the final aim of all scientific investigation.”
— Albert Weiss (1925), A Theoretical Basis of Human Behavior (pg. 36) (Ѻ)

“All forms of social activity or achievement are ultimately reducible to electron-proton interactions [that are mechanistic as any physical or chemical process].”
— Albert Weiss (1925), A Theoretical Basis of Human Behavior (pg. 142); cited by Judson Herrick (1956) [1]

In 1939, George Lundberg, in his Foundations of Sociology, citing Weiss, would going onto famous describe man as an “electron-proton configuration”. [2]

In 1956, Judson Herrick was citing Weiss' view that: "forms of social activity or achievement are ultimately reducible to electron-proton interactions [that are mechanistic as any physical or chemical process]". [3]

References
1. (a) Weiss, Albert P. (1925). A Theoretical Basis of Human Behavior. R.G. Adams & Co, 1929.
(b) Herrick, Charles J. (1956). The Evolution of Human Nature (abs) (pg. 46). University of Texas Press.
2. (a) Lundberg, George. (1939). Foundations of Sociology (electron-proton, pgs. 40, 204-05). MacMillan.
(b) Anon. (1948). “Article” (pg. 16), Social Forces, Vol. 26.
3. Herrick, Charles J. (1956). The Evolution of Human Nature (abs) (pg. 46). University of Texas Press.

TDics icon ns